Tuesday, June 8, 2010

CraftShare: Insulating Fabric & Chic Lunch Bag Tutorial



Hey CraftSharers!  Last week we spent some time on Laminated Cotton.  Loads of uses & fun ideas  for all kinds of projects.  If you missed anything or want to refer back, just click on the CraftShare tab at the top of the blog.  I'll keep all past CraftShare posts there so it's easy to find info anytime.  This week we'll be checking out another cool fabric: Thermal Batting!



What is Thermal Batting (aka insulated lining)?  This polyester looks like batting, but is needlepricked with a metallic film to make it insulate, so just like a thermos, it helps keep the hot thing hot & the cool things cool.  There are loads of great uses for it & I can think of some great winter projects like mittens, a cozy coat, toasty snowpants & the list goes on.  However, since it's 70+ degrees and the start of summer, those aren't exactly the kinds of projects most of us want to work on right now. Soooooo,

For today's project, Chic Lunch Sac, I'm combining laminated cotton & thermal batting to make a lunchbag we can take out & about in the heat and still keep things tasting cool.  



What you'll need:
1/4 yd Laminated Cotton or PUL
1/4 yd Thermal Batting/Insulated Lining
Double fold bias tape
2 snaps (or velcro) for closure
Sewing notions (thread, rotary cutter/scissors, bobby pins) 


Super easy to make, just cut one rectangle 11"x 26" of Thermal Batting and two rectangles from the laminated cotton (I used laminated cotton for outer & PUL for the lining).


Lay the thermal batting piece on the wrong side of one of the fabric pieces.  Right sides facing, fold lengthwise.  Do the same for the lining piece.


Stitch up the sides.   Mark 2" squares out of the bottom corners of each piece:


Pull the marking lines together at the corners to square them off & then stitch down the line of each corner like this (stitch twice for reinforcement):


Trim the excess fabric triangles off:


Turn the outer bag right side out and insert the lining bag inside.  Line up the side seams using bobby pins (so you don't leave holes in your fabric):


Attach bias tape to the open edges using your bobby pins again:


Stitch on your bias tape to attach the outer & lining together:


I added two snaps for the closure.  Toss in an icepack and the goodies you want to keep cool and you're good to go!  I made mine match the Laminated Beach Bag I made earlier, so we'd keep all our on-the-go stuff clean & fresh!


What projects do you think thermal batting would be ideal for?  Have you used it yourself?  Don't be shy - share your ideas & tips in the comments and your pics in the CraftShare Flickr pool so everyone can be inspired!



Sharing this with my fave link parties too so check them out here!

33 comments:

  1. Who knew a lunch sack could be sooo cute!! Love it!!

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  2. I have some insul bright at home and didn't think to make a lunch bag! What a great idea! I had used mine to make potholders for my mom :)

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  3. I don't really think outside the box and thought insulbright was only for making hotpads - - but I have some leftover from hotpads and now I know what I want to do! - - thanks for linking to Take-A-Look Tuesday! - Mandy, www.craftedition.blogspot.com

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  4. Coincidentally, I just made a child's oven mitt using this! I'll add it to the flickr pool. Also, the tutorial I used is linked in my blog post if anyone wants to try it out...it was really easy!

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  5. I'm still waiting for my laminated cotton to come in the mail but I was thinking . . . insulated travel casserole bag. I'll get it up on the flick pool, as well as my car seat protectors once they are finished.

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  6. What a great idea to use bobby pins! I can't say I've seen that before I looked at your blog. Great tip!


    http://iheartjennysart.com

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  7. I love this! Too cute! I would love to make a few lunch bags...maybe one for each day of the week!

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  8. LOVE it as always!! ;)

    Clever gal!!!

    Bird

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  9. I love the fabric you used!! This is a great tutorial. My little boy is going off to preschool next year. I am trying to stock pile ideas of things he will need...i.e. lunch box. Thanks for sharing!

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  10. Oh my gosh! The fabric is so cute!
    I'm going to look for that fabric- my girls are always borrowing my lunch bag & then I don't have one!

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  11. Hi - I'm a new follower...I just love this tutorial. I'm always on the search for relative easy & practical sewing projects...this one is now on my never-ending list of things to make. I can't wait to see more.

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  12. What a FABULOUS idea! I have been wanting to try something with that kind of material! I love your tutorial and how adorable your bag turned out! Thanks for linking up to Hoo's got talent!

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  13. Thanks for linking up to the Mad Skills party!

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  14. I wish I knew how to sew!! I'm an artist, but my sewing skills blow!

    Following from Follow Me Friday!! I hope you have the chance to stop by my blog and do the same. :) Have a great weekend.

    http://theartsymom.tk

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  15. Thanks a ton for the tutorial! Trying to figure out a pattern for one of these was on my "to do" list. Super cute!

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  16. What a great idea and I love the fabric. Thanks for linking to We're Organized Wednesday.

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  17. Insulated grocery bag would be great for frozen goods. Especially if the closest store is not so close, or if you live where the temperatures are on the hotter side.

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  18. I'd never heard of insul-fleece before. What a great idea for the lunch bags and also the insulated grocery bags that another commenter mentioned! Thanks for sharing this! Judy @ KAMsnaps.com

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  19. I am going to use this same concept but make my son a car seat cooler with it. Here in AZ it gets to be 110f out and hotter. All the ones I have been looking for are way to expansive for me like almost $50 and they don't even cover the whole seat just where they sit, but all the plastic well heck even the fabric all over the seat get scorching. So I figured I might as well make my own.

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    1. What a great idea - I would love to see it when you do. And I know what you mean - I have family in AZ and when visiting in the summer the heat was intense, the metal on my sunglasses burnt my face! Hope yours keeps the little guy cool.

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  20. I came across your blog via iheartnaptime.net. I am so glad I did because I was looking for an idea for a lunch bag for my daughter. Thanks!

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    1. So glad this helps Maggie! Would love to see yours when you make one:)

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  21. This is amazing! I've been trying to find a very small, insulated lunch bag so I could expand my lunch possibilities (I'm a student and on campus without a break often for 10 hours at a time). My problem was always that even the smallest lunch bags won't fit into my messenger bag. All I really needed was something like this; a sandwich-sized, insulated bag. I have food-grade PUL to line the insides (I've been toying with the idea of making sandwich bags for a while), and thermal batting seems easy to get. I do have one question, though. How long does your food stay insulated? If I slipped a little frozen gel pack in with the sandwich, would it stay cold a long time?

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    1. I'm so glad this tutorial has helped! If something is already chilled it should stay cool for a couple of hours. If you put in a cold pack it will definitely extend that time and keep the temp nice and low.

      I also have a sandwich bag how-to coming up in a month or so - it'll be a great reusable bag for a sandwich or some small snacks:)

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  22. Hi thank you for sharing! I've looked everywhere for a pattern like yours! :)

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  23. I used the insulated stuff in an experiment a few years ago... My kids' lunch bags always came home at nearly room temperature, even with an ice pack. Considering how far into the day lunch is, I had to wonder how cold it was at that time. I had complaints from my kids about the state of cheese in their lunches as well... So I took last year's basic lunch bag apart and found that all that was between the cold lunch and the warm weather was the inner lining, a thin layer of foam (that gapped at the seams), and canvas.

    Ha. Well, I cut some of the insulated material, a layer of batting, and another layer of vinyl and added these to the insides. I wish I could remember where I put each one, as I'm pretty sure I went the route of putting in the insulation in such a way as to keep heat out... well, with layers like that, you can imagine that it's pretty bulky but also comes home cold. Why can't manufacturers manage this? Yeah, I know. Costs. Well, that kind is good enough for my teen who seldom takes things that must remain cold, but my son, who loves ham and cheese, loves his retrofitted lunch bag.

    Your design is wonderfully simple, but how do you fasten the top? If there's something easier than a zipper, I'd like to know it! I hate installing zippers... It was murder getting that other one bag together and I'd like to be able to make a bag for our littlest one.

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    1. I just used snaps - super easy and with an ice pack int he bag it worked great. You could set them in a different way so you could roll down the top and have it snap close that way too or just go the velcro route. I agree on the zippers - if it's nice & straight it's no problem, but when it had to bend or curve I hate doing them!

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  24. Where can I buy the insulated batting?

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    1. You can find this at most fabric & quilting stores like Jo-Ann or Hobby Lobby. It's usually in the Home Dec fabric section. Insul Bright is the brand I use.

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